Blog | 5 Things You Might Not Know About Alley Theatre

5 Things You Might Not Know About Alley Theatre

By admin | September 22, 2016

Alley Theatre’s Three Stories Up is coming to a Secret Location October 20-31 and the murder mystery set in the dark is already garnering buzz! Check out this article in the Vancouver Courier.

Did you know that Marisa and Daniel, the Co-Artistic Producers behind Alley Theatre are married in real life?

Did you know that Marisa and Daniel, the Co-Artistic Producers behind Alley Theatre are married in real life?

In the meantime, get to know Alley Theatre a bit better. Here are five things about the company you probably don’t know, but should:

1. Alley Theatre got their name because their first play took place off Railspur Alley on Granville Island as part of the Vancouver Fringe. However, over the years it has come to mean more. Their work takes you off the beaten path or off the main street—just like an alley does. They shine light on stories not often told and take audiences into places they might not expect, so an “alley” makes sense for all the right reasons.

2. Co-artistic producers Marisa Emma Smith and Daniel Arnold have played adopted siblings (Little One) and prosecutor and accused (Tape) but in real life they are married! The two actually met at the Vancouver Fringe in 2007!

3. Alley Theatre mostly produces  scripts that are either in the process of being written or have already been written. Even though they do a lot of new work and development, they have yet to “devise” a play. That’s not to say they still won’t try it, but usually when they sit down to do something, there are already some words on the page.

4. They have a really cool board of directors. They gather every six weeks or so to drink wine, eat taco chips, and make up work plans for the future of the company. Their diverse group consists of a librarian, engineer, two accountants (they need help with math sometimes), a sex educator (sexy!), an actress, an account manager at VanCity, a PHD student from UBC that specializes in Canadian Feminist Theatre, and a graphic designer with her own design firm. Alley Theatre are so grateful for all their board has given to the company!

5. Alley Theatre raises money for other non-profits! Even though they are a non-profit themselves, sometimes shows have a social or political message and they like to include direct action as part of their audience’s ticket purchase. During the run of Mrs. Warren’s Profession at the Rickshaw they raise over $1,400 for Wish Drop-In Centre and Pace Society. For the run of O’wet/Lost Lagoon, over a $1,000 was raised for the Vancouver Aboriginal Friendship Centre.

Click here to find out more about Three Stories Up and to purchase your tickets!

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